Learning area
learn-logo-img ROADSTONE ONLINE SEMINARS.
Concrete Specification and Solutions
Van Learn about the specification of concrete and practical solutions to design requests. This webinar will address the specification of concrete in Ireland, concrete onsite testing, finishes and mix types. It will also address recommendations around the use of concrete in hot and cold weather. Finally, you will learn about the concrete services offered by Roadstone.

Architectural Concrete

Contact us for sales or technical advice on this product

Description

Architectural concrete mixes are specifically designed and manufactured to provide the highest quality surface finishes. Sometimes referred to as visual or fair faced concrete, architectural concrete has a more visually pleasing appearance compared with conventional concrete mixes. Architectural concrete demands careful selection of materials and requires a relatively high cement content to achieve a rich concrete matrix that will in turn give an improved and consistent surface finish both in texture and colour. In achieving an architectural concrete finish, the selection of the formwork type, release agent, workmanship in placing, compacting, curing and protecting the concrete are vital elements to achieving the desired quality of finish.

Key Features & Benefits
  • Visually pleasing finish
  • Good reflective properties (reduces lighting costs)
  • Low in life time maintenance
  • Made from local materials manufactured to the highest standards
Applications
  • Aesthetically important elements and structures
  • Offices, showrooms and commercial buildings
  • Schools and educational institutions
  • Bridges
  • Domestic dwelling
Technical Specification

I.S. EN 206:2013 – Concrete – Specification, performance, production and conformity

FAQs
What is architectural concrete?

A specially designed concrete mix that provides a high quality, blemish free finish.

Can architectural concrete be placed by conventional methods?

Yes, architectural concrete can be placed by conventional methods, with placement by skip being most common.